NaPoWriMo Warming Up

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It’s that time of year again, AWF is signed up to the main website and I will be participating in NaPoWriMo for the (I have lost count) maybe my 8th year. Since I discovered it in 2014. I often join in with groups and more than one daily prompt but after the year I have had so far and still wrestling deadlines, I will just be logging into the main website for prompts. At least this is my intention – but who knows. April can get crazy!

Those of you who read this blog regularly will know I rarely post an entire poem, rather I post daily posts about my NaPo process and motivation/tips to get you through your 30 days of Poetry. Every year I have had some successful publication with Napo poems (after a little work). Editing is not part of the NaPo process. Just write for now.

The other bonus of Napo* is I always finish the month with a ton of new poetry resources and often discover some-new-to-me poets.

*Nowadays it’s known as GloPoWriMo and rightly so as it is a global event, I’m old school and prefer to call it NaPo.

HISTORY:

NaPoWriMo, or National Poetry Writing Month, is an annual project in which participating poets attempt to write a poem a day for the month of April (USA). The founder of napowrimo.net is Maureen Thorson, a poet living in Washington, DC

Inspired by NaNoWriMo, or National Novel Writing Month), she started writing a poem a day for the month of April back in 2003, posting the poems on her blog. When other people started writing poems for April, and posting them on their own blogs, Maureen linked to them. After a few years, so many people were doing NaPoWriMo that Maureen decided to launch an independent website for the project. © napowrimo.net

HOW IT WORKS:

How does it work? Simple — just write a poem every day from April 1 to April 30… If you fall behind, you can catch up. If you feel like writing two poems a day, go for it! The idea is just to get your creative juices flowing. As always, we’ll be featuring a new, optional prompt every day during the month, as well as a bonus “early-bird” prompt that will be posted on March 31. Each day we’ll also feature a participant’s work. And one positive of the pandemic has been that poetry reading series have moved online, so it’s easier than ever to see and hear your favorite poets read their work. We’ll feature a reading every day, alternating between recorded videos of past readings that you can peruse at your leisure, and scheduled readings that you can watch live. © napowrimo.net

So, grab yourself a brand new notebook, save a document/folder for NaPo Prompts and Poems on your tech and get some rest before April begins. Are you ready for a month of writing poetry? Of course you are!

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