NaPoWriMo 2018 Day 21

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The inevitable landslide of working, preparing for festivals, editing, experiencing some sunshine and falling days behind with NaPo… but it is week 3 and up until now I was following the plan well. I have learnt over the years to forgive myself as I think this naturally happens to everyone who is balancing elements of life. If you do not forgive yourself, you end up using writing energy as negative self-sabotage and that gets you nowhere.

Onward. Or backwards (technically)!

Day 21:

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Today marks three full weeks of Na/GloPoWriMo!

Our featured participant for the day is Unassorted Stories, where the rebellious poem for Day 19 shows how repetition, used well, can drive a poem along, giving it momentum and heft. It also provides a really interesting window into the poet’s “rules,” which she broke in writing the poem.

Today, we have a new interview for you, with Antoinette Brim, whose newest book of poetry, These Women You Gave Me, has been published by Indolent Books. Brim is a Cave Canem Foundation fellow, a recipient of the Walker Foundation Scholarship to the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, and a Pushcart Prize nominee. You can read some of her poems here and here, and you can check out our interview with her here.

And now for our (optional) prompt. In her interview, Brim provides us with several suggestions for generative writing exercises, and we’d like to challenge to today to tackle her third one, which is based in the myth of Narcissus. After reading the myth, try writing a poem that plays with the myth in some way. For example, you could imagine that imagine the water is speaking to you, the narcissus flower. Or you could write a poem in which the narcissus berates the Kardashians for stealing their neurosis. Or a poem that comments on the narcissism of our time, i.e. beauty and body obsession, etc.

Happy writing!

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I enjoyed getting to know the poetry of Antoinette Brim today. I was interested by the prompt of a myth I know well, what I didn’t know was that the narcissus flower is the daffodil. I have always been amazed at how these flowers spread and whole puddles of them appear where they were never planted.

Due to being several days behind, I would call it a stanza rather than a poem. I planned to work in short form, but it is free verse.

I hope to work on this one later in the year. A post summer revisit!

 

the bulb, a house of toxins.

5ab39dd423e2c-bpfull The Poetry School Day 21

Day 21: Word Association (Redux)

Morning poets. Another slight reinterpretation of a prompt from last year. Below is a list of ten words. I would like you – quickly, without thinking about it – to scribble down a word you associate with each one of them.

Wood
Protection
Magazine
Float
Shed
Inner
Capable
Clash
Wax
Daughter

Now use your ten new words in your poem, one per line. If you’re up for a challenge, use the words in the order you have them; if you’d like a bit more flexibility, use them in any order.

NB: Don’t use the above words in your poem – use the words you associated with them, e.g. not ‘Wax’, but ‘Candle’ or ‘Drip’. If you don’t want to start with the words we’ve given you, open the closest book to you and pick the last word on every page from 30 to 39 and associate from that.

 

I made my word association list and plan to work on it later.

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