NapoWriMo 2018 Day 10

Standard

napofeature1

Come on! We can do this! We are 1/3 of the way through NaPo 2018… I cannot believe it.

This morning I am happy, I have a title for the Working Title Poem of Day 7. I played around with anagrams, I had several to choose from.

  1. Note at Preached/ Preached to Neat / A Taped Coherent / Open at Detacher

This title ‘Open at Detacher’ sums the events/subject of the work up and has life to it.

Titles are hard and a poem without one doesn’t feel fully formed. A title can do so much work for you.


napo2018button2

Our featured participant for the day is method two madness, where the small-and-large poem for Day 9 plays with repetition . . . and birds!

Today’s craft resource is this fascinating article that details the writing and revision process for a poem by former U.S. poet laureate Natasha Trethewey. It provides a really unique glimpse into a writer’s process, and the steps by which a poem takes its final shape.

Finally, here is our (optional) daily prompt. Usually, we take inspiration from our craft resource, but since our resource is about revision, we’ll go a bit further afield for this one! Today, we’d like to challenge you to write a poem of simultaneity – in which multiple things are happing at once. A nice example might be Emily Dickinson’s “I heard a Fly buzz – when I died”, or this powerful poem by Sarah Green.

Happy writing!

5ab39dd423e2c-bpfullThe Poetry School Day 10

Day 10: Anagram Rhyme 

Morning poets. After a couple of days of being nice, I’m back to the difficult prompts. This one does what it says on the tin. I’d like you to write a poem using anagram rhyme — that is, your rhyming words should be anagrams of each other. Have a look at ‘The Heron’ by Randall Mann and ‘Illustration from Parsifal’ by Richie Hofmann to get the idea. These two are in couplets but yours doesn’t have to be.


This sounds challenging and amuses me as I have spent the morning playing with anagrams for my title.

pexels-photo.jpg

I may need a stronger coffee!

I spent a good half an hour searching rhyming anagrams

https://wordsmith.org/anagram/ deciding I had enough, I set about writing a rhyming poem. I rarely rhyme my work so the technique of starting with the end-rhyme was helpful.

Again I wrote a piece based on Dementia for the PoArtry project, I am not sure it will be used in full but there be the odd line or stanza that will transfer or become something else. There was a certain restriction with this writing challenge.

It took a while to edit to a poem I am vaguely happy with. It captures sadness and uses rhyming anagrams, although I have rearranged the line breaks so it is not obviously to the eye, which echoes the subject matter.

we navigated tundra endings,

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s