NaPoWriMo Day 5

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For the first time since the start of NaPo I have found myself time limited. I am following four different prompt areas this month and tend to write from two sources. This means that my NaPo poetry has already reached double figures.

Today whilst at work I considered the nature prompt from NaPoWriMo, I made some notes hoping to work on a poem this evening. http://www.napowrimo.net/day-five-4/

I was too tired to concentrate when I first got home, then fell asleep. I have an idea that is bubbling in my head and would like to form a poem before bed. However, I know that this is the only prompt/poem I will create today. Carrie Etter’s prompt is a prose poem and that is a style I tend to steer clear of. I will attempt it at some point but also like the idea of stashing documents of prompts away to face later in the year. So I will forgive myself and move on if I don’t take the prose prompt. NaPo is all about forgiveness, I learnt that the first year I tried it. It is my 4th year doing this crazy poem-a-day thing.


allotment 2

© A.Cooke 2013

I was excited when I saw Mary Oliver on today’s Napo thread. I bought her book ‘ A Poetry Handbook’ at the tail end of 2013, my year of learning.

The featured poet came from the Enigma prompt https://ccthinks.wordpress.com/2017/04/04/when-this-boy-croons-every-moon-in-june-blooms-napowrimo-day-4-enigma-variations/

The interview was with Mary Oliver http://www.oprah.com/entertainment/maria-shriver-interviews-poet-mary-oliver

Read her poetry here https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems-and-poets/poets/detail/mary-oliver#about

poetry foundation

And the reason for the allotment photo… the prompt was about an experienced nature, (I didn’t actually write about the allotment, despite having a mini series of allotment poems).

In honor of Mary Oliver’s work, I’d like to challenge you to write a poem that is based in the natural world: it could be about a particular plant, animal, or a particular landscape. But it should be about a slice of the natural world that you have personally experienced and optimally, one that you have experienced often. Try to incorporate specific details while also stating why you find the chosen place or plant/animal meaningful. © Napo.net 2017

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My poem was about flowers. It mentions radial patterns and US Airlines following spoke and hub routes…

It is yet to define itself as a poem!


Carrie Etter’s Prompt was to write a prose poem.

The Poetry School Day 5: The Aubade (touches of 52). An aubade is a poem addressing the break of day. A traditional aubade often featured the parting of lovers, but yours doesn’t have to. It also doesn’t have to be an ode to the morning; morning can arrive quite gently or tangentially in your poem — but it has to be there. Two example poems today, neither of which is remotely traditional (after all, you all know Larkin’s ‘Aubade’ already, don’t you?).
 
Carl Phillips: Aubade: Some Peaches, After Storm
https://www.poets.org/poetsorg/poem/aubade-some-peaches-after-storm
 
Ocean Vuong: Aubade with Burning City
https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poetrymagazine/poems/detail/56769

© The Poetry School 2017


Jo Bell (encouraging a month of reading) posted NaPoReMo (National Poetry Read(ing) Month), Song by Adrienne Rich.


Be inspired (I’ve got poetry to go and write) x

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